Justin Williams — Arcana
May
5
Jun 3

Justin Williams — Arcana

Justin Williams, Devola, 2017, oil, pigment, sand, enamel on canvas, 152 x 203 cm

Justin Williams, Devola, 2017, oil, pigment, sand, enamel on canvas, 152 x 203 cm

For Justin Williams, Arcana represents an exploration of the self through painterly and sculptural engagements with mythology and folklore. Appearing in this new exhibition are recurrent figures from the artist’s oeuvre, including missing chef Willie Koeppen, and cult-leader Anne Hamilton Burns of the Family. These figures take on new meaning for the artist, as representations of an attempt to understand the self, through explorations of our folkloric pasts.
 
This exhibition sees Williams engage with large scale painting and ceramic forms, incorporating gold leaf and sand, alongside raw pigment and oil paint, to produce affect in his experimental, and textural works. Presenting like the fall of cards in a tarot deck, Arcana is an embodied attempt at understanding within the tumult of the contemporary, and allows the viewer a chance to divine possible futures for the artist, and themselves.
 
Williams has held numerous solo exhibitions, including the highly acclaimed Figures & Vessels at ART 3 in New York, in 2016. This exhibition, one of Forbes Magazine’s ‘Must-See’ exhibitions, garnered significant critical attention, with Williams described as ‘Australia’s latest Emerging Talent’. 2015 saw Williams present Stained Mountain at Anna Pappas Gallery, where the artist explored his relationship to place through the mythologies of various figures from local Victorian folklore. Other solo exhibitions include Viridian, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Mountain I Miss You, 2013, Mild Manner, Brisbane; A Touch of Norway, 2012, Lapis Lazuli Pop Up Factory Gallery, Melbourne.
 
His selected group exhibitions include the  touring exhibition Got It For Cheap, which travelled across Europe from David Risley Gallery, Copenhagen to Steinsland Berliner Gallery, Stockholm and Agnes B’d Gallerie du Jour, Paris, in 2016. Williams was curated into the Anna Pappas Gallery Booth at the Melbourne Art Fair in 2014; Project 14: Free Range, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery; Trouble in Paradise, 2012, Paradise Hills Gallery, Melbourne; and Group Show, 2012, Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne. He has been featured in Artist Profile, ARTSY, Australian Creative and New York Arts Magazine, and was featured as an artist garnering significant global attention in Australian Art Collector’s first issue of 2017.
 
2017 will also see Anna Pappas Gallery present works by Williams on the global stage at Art Athina Art Fair, Athens, taking place alongside documenta14, which will see a concentrated international art world focus on Athens.

Dominic Kavanagh — Eden's Hollow
May
5
Jun 4

Dominic Kavanagh — Eden's Hollow

Dominic Kavanagh, Eden’s Hollow, 2017 site-specific installation, dimensions variable

Dominic Kavanagh, Eden’s Hollow, 2017 site-specific installation, dimensions variable

In Eden’s Hollow Dominic Kavanagh presents a site through which our contemporary relationship to urban decay can be explored. Using discarded industrial materials, alongside earth, weeds, water and light, Kavanagh constructs monuments to decay and regeneration within the gallery walls.

A focus on the architectural power of ruins informs Kavanagh’s engagement with the language of decomposition. With light mysteriously emanating from deep within Kavanagh’s installation of brick, steel, earth and rubble, and with water flowing from various crevices, Eden’s Hollow rejects passivity, and instead presents a growing, living, fluid testament to the ruins that emerge from sites of industrial abandonment.  

Solo exhibitions include The Beehive, Blindside Gallery, Melbourne, 2014; Relics of Utopia, Seventh Gallery, Fitzroy, 2013; Picnic at Phoenix Falls, Incinerator Art Gallery, Moonee Ponds, 2013, Requiem for Urban Ruin: The Lock-Up, The Lock-Up Cultural Centre, Newcastle, 2013; and Substituting Nature, C3 Contemporary Art Space, Abbotsford, 2012.

In 2016 Kavanagh was curated into the group exhibition This Place. That Place. No Place by Irina Asriian/In Exile Projects, an exhibition at Neon Parlour, as well as Under Construction, at Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, curated by Claire Watson, and Closing Exhibition, curated by Marie Schoenmaker, at Conduit Arts, Fitzroy. Other group exhibitions include Seven Trumpets, Strange Neighbour, Fitzroy, 2014; The Gleaner’s Archive, D11, Docklands, 2014; and Noise Flash, curated by Todd Anderson-Kunert for the 2013 Liquid Architecture Festival, Melbourne.

Kavanagh has been shortlisted for numerous awards, and is represented in private collections.

Art Athina 2017 — Various Artists
May
26
May 28

Art Athina 2017 — Various Artists

Art Athina, Greece
25 – 28 May 2017

Announcing our participation in one of the oldest and most prestigious art fairs in Europe, Art Athina, in 2017, presenting works by Jayne Dyer, Michaela Gleave, Troy Innocent, George Raftopoulos, Karyn Taylor and Justin Williams.

Coinciding with the presence of documenta14 in Athens, Art Athina provides a unique opportunity for the exhibition of our artists on a global stage. 

http://www.art-athina.gr/

Jun
9
Jul 30

George Raftopoulos — deKonstruKt

George Raftopoulos, ROTUNΔΑ, 2017, mixed media on archival board, 30 x 42cm

George Raftopoulos, ROTUNΔΑ, 2017, mixed media on archival board, 30 x 42cm

OPENING: June 9. 6pm

deKonstruKt sees George Raftopoulos embrace rawness and immediacy as he strips back his painterly and sculptural compositions to illuminate the exploration of the self within the contemporary era.

Through his gestural approach to oil painting and sensitivity toward the raw material of the canvas, Raftopoulos is engaged in an act of ‘dekonstruktion’, which is at once embodied and conceptual. In his hands, paint becomes electric, and clay evokes the flesh of the body, with materiality and the surface figuring at the centre of his exploratory practice.

Known for his fierce explorations of universal themes across history and memory, Raftopoulos states that he is attempting 'to preserve the electrifying jolt of a single moment-in amber; to catapult a timeless past into the visceral presence so that it can be felt by another human being.’

Raftopoulos has held numerous exhibitions including, The TRANSPORTED, Nishi Gallery, Canberra, 2016; MYTHIC Nation, Artereal Gallery Sydney, 2015; Retrospecta, Greek Embassy, Canberra, 2015; I Could’ve been a Jockey, Bega Regional Gallery, Bega, 2014.

Many significant collections hold works by Raftopoulos, including the Bega Valley Regional Gallery, Bega, Hellenic Museum, Melbourne, Gold Coast City Art Gallery/Museum, Gold Coast, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia, and the Molongolo Group, Canberra.

 


Troy Innocent – Pattern Recognition
Mar
24
Apr 29

Troy Innocent – Pattern Recognition

Troy Innocent, Correlation Clustering, 2016 laser cut plywood, hardboard and acrylic with augmented reality, 52 x 32 x 26cm

Troy Innocent, Correlation Clustering, 2016 laser cut plywood, hardboard and acrylic with augmented reality, 52 x 32 x 26cm

Exhibition Opening: Friday 24 March 6pm-8pm

Exhibition to be introduced by Aaron Martin (Five Walls Projects)

Digital Abstract catalogue essay by Giles Fielke

In Pattern Recognition, Troy Innocent interrogates the hidden potential of geometric abstraction, through the visual language of code. For this exhibition, Innocent places agency in the hands of the viewer, challenging the static nature of sculptural forms. Through the use of an augmented reality application, the viewer reveals layers of animation, information and music, coded within the geometric language of Innocent’s works.   

From digital maps for wayfinding, to visualisations of climate change, or the predication of election results, pattern recognition is central to this worldview, as it is coded into the abstractions through which we understand the contemporary world. In this exhibition, Innocent applies strategies of pattern recognition to psychogeographic abstractions – spatial maps of cities he has walked, folded in time and space.

As Innocent states: ‘code mediates and creates the world simultaneously, giving rise to a rich multiplicity of meaning as it traverses the virtual and the actual.’

In the 1990s, Innocent represented the vanguard of Australian new media arts as the co-founder of the digital arts collective Cyber Dada. With Cyber Dada, Innocent heralded the cyber world as an ‘enveloping phenomenon, a techno-determinist vision of change’ and presented pioneering collaborative and collective digital works, including the language-oriented, interactive CD-ROM artwork Idea-ON! (1992).

Recent solo exhibitions see Innocent combine digital innovation, specifically coding, with sculptural forms and geometric abstraction. These exhibitions include Double Abstraction (2016), Five Walls Projects, Melbourne and New Abstraction (2015), Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne.

For Asemic Writing 1 (2013), Hugo Michell Gallery, Innocent mediated the visual language of graffiti through screen-based digital works. Nine Signs for Ogaki (2012) Hugo Michell Gallery, stemmed from Innocent’s 2010 residency at IAMAS – an Art & Science research institute in Ogaki, Japan – where the artist surveyed the landscape around him, creating visual codes and dispersing them throughout the town. Innocent’s work in Japan informed the exhibition Tokyo Pop // Ludean Play, at Trocadero Art Space, Melbourne (2011), which documented the artist’s engagements with play and mapping across Tokyo. Other solo exhibitions exploring language, cityscapes and digital media include Scenes from Ludea, Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney (2006) and Ludea, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne (2005).
 
Digital engagements with urban cityscapes inform Innocent’s strong public art presence, and includes works such as Zydnei (2013), an interactive street game exploring the lasting effects of colonisation, a work coinciding with the 2013 International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA), Sydney. Innocent presented an interactive sculpture garden entitled Colony (2008) in the Melbourne Docklands, and an alternate reality game reinventing the history of Melbourne, Urban Codemakers (2010), Docklands, as well as x-milieu, Federation Square Melbourne (2008) and Field of Play, Melbourne Docklands (2007).
  
Group exhibitions have taken place at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland; Tate Gallery, Liverpool, UK; Performance Space, Sydney and the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne. Innocent is represented in numerous collections, including the V&A Museum, London, ACMI, Artbank, the Lyon Collection, and other private collections.
 
Innocent holds a PhD in Animation and Interactive Media from RMIT University, Melbourne.

Andrea Eckersley — Partial coherence
Mar
24
Apr 29

Andrea Eckersley — Partial coherence

Andrea Eckersley, Partial coherence, 2017, site-specific painting and light installation, dimensions variable

Andrea Eckersley, Partial coherence, 2017, site-specific painting and light installation, dimensions variable

Exhibition Opening: Friday 24 March 6pm-8pm

Exhibition to be introduced by Dr Terri Bird (Monash University)

Andrea Eckersley in Conversation with Meredith Turnbull

Andrea Eckersley works with an expanded understanding of painting, where the surface of the artwork becomes more than the application of pigment to canvas and instead manifests itself as a site of material investigation. Through recasting relationships with painting practice, Partial coherence presents a space within which the canvas, the wall, lighting and the body are implicated in the realisation and experience of an artwork. Alongside painterly works, Eckersley utilises light installations, bronze sculptures, constructed shelving and garment making, in order to position surfaces, affect and material as uniquely interrelated concepts.
 
Eckersley is a lecturer in Fashion Design, at RMIT University and received a PhD in Fine Arts (Painting) from Monash University in 2016. Primarily interested in the way the body interacts with abstract shapes, Andrea’s work investigates the material aspects of painting with a particular focus on surfaces. She has recently contributed a chapter for the upcoming book Practising with Deleuze: design, dance, art, writing, philosophy (forthcoming Edinburgh University Press). Eckersley is the art editor at the Deleuze Studies Journal and contributes to national and international conferences.
 
Previous solo exhibitions include Shed by the sun in eclipse in 2016 at Sarah Scout Presents, Melbourne, in which the artist explored painterly surfaces as events, felt as differences in intensity. Eckersley’s exhibition Surface Activations, 2015, Monash University School of Art, Design and Architecture Graduate Gallery, Melbourne, considered relationships between painting and the surface, through materials including light and sculpture, as well as painting. The exhibition was the culmination of the artist’s PhD research project. In 2014, Eckersley was curated into Depthless Flatness by artists Bryan Spier and Steven Rendall, as part of ‘Incidents Above a Bar’, a series of exhibitions interrogating contemporary painting theory and practice.

Eckersley has exhibited at Platform Public Contemporary Art Spaces, Nellie Castan Gallery, Craft Victoria, c3 and West Space in Melbourne. In 2016 she was the inaugural winner of the Royal Como Art Prize in 2016. Eckersley is represented in various Australian private collections, as well as the Justin Art Foundation.

Project 17 – Radical Immanence
Feb
10
Mar 18

Project 17 – Radical Immanence

Renee Cosgrave, Mother and Father (detail), 2016, oil on linen, 61 x 45.5cm. Photo: Christo Crocker

Renee Cosgrave, Mother and Father (detail), 2016, oil on linen, 61 x 45.5cm. Photo: Christo Crocker

Antonia Sellbach | Ben Jones | Franky Howell | Isabelle de Kleine | Max Lawrence White | Melanie Irwin | Nanou Dupuis | Paul Williams | Renee Cosgrave | Tai Snaith | Teelah George | Tim Bučković

Curated by Chantelle Mitchell

Exhibition Opening: Friday 10 February 6-8pm

Guest Speaker: Helen Hughes (Research Curator, Monash University Museum of Art)

What could it mean to engage with material in sincere terms? 
To what extent is this a radical, contemporary act?

The annual APG Project Series, a keystone within the Melbourne arts program, provides a significant platform through which contemporary currents and key concerns can be interrogated and explored. 

A curated group exhibition, Radical Immanence brings together the work of twelve Australian contemporary artists to explore concepts of sincerity and materiality as located within an expanded field of painterly practice. 

Within the whorling maelstrom of contemporary culture, the exhibition invites sincere contemplation and engagement with materiality and form, an acute sensitivity to the vibrations which ‘underlie the solidity of things’. Within this context, the exhibition asks: what could it mean to engage with material in sincere terms? To what extent is this a radical, contemporary act?

Oscillating between highly gestural mark making, embodied practice, geometric investigations and colour theory, each artist is united by unique reverence and conviction in their explorations of material potentials, and individual concerns. Eschewing self-consciousness in favour of a sensitivity to material and form, this exhibition encourages a return to looking inward, to sensitivity, in order to better orient ourselves within uncertain and tumultuous times. 

Although the exhibition looks toward the experimental potential of both representational and non-representational painterly practices, it also seeks to break down traditional material boundaries, emphasising possibilities as occurring within and outside the formal limitations of medium and concept.

Review by David Wlazlo for Memo Review


Selected Works

Anna Pappas Gallery – Bendigo Inaugural Group Show
Oct
22
Dec 11

Anna Pappas Gallery – Bendigo Inaugural Group Show

Jack Rowland, Welcome to Nowhere, Oil on linen, 86.5 x 200c

Jack Rowland, Welcome to Nowhere, Oil on linen, 86.5 x 200c

Opening Event: Saturday 22 October, 2-4pm, featuring an Artist Talk from Justin Williams
Exhibition: Saturday 22 October – Saturday 10 December 2016

Anna Pappas Gallery will be featuring the work of artists including Justin Williams, Joanna Logue, Jarek Wojcik, Marc Standing and Simon McEwan at the Bendigo Inaugural Group Show, an exhibition in partnership with Gallery 369 in Bendigo.

Gallery 369 is located at 369 Hargreaves Street, Bendigo, Victoria

Opening Hours:  Monday to Friday 10 -17.30, Saturday 10-4.

 

Michael Vale – The Transit of Mercury
Oct
8
Nov 7

Michael Vale – The Transit of Mercury

Michael Vale, The Brillig, 2015, oil on linen, 122 x 92 cm

Michael Vale, The Brillig, 2015, oil on linen, 122 x 92 cm

OPENING NIGHT: FRIDAY 7 OCTOBER
EXHIBITION: 7 OCTOBER – 5 NOVEMBER 2016

Romantic Strangeness Flourishes in the Paintings of Michael Vale

As the English poet Alice Oswald writes, Mercury is ‘a violently magic little place…’ and Michael Vale’s paintings act as portals into an esoteric realm, unlocked thirteen times each century by the transit of this quicksilver planet around the sun.

Deeply engaged in the exploration of the mysterious worlds between our inner and outer experiences, Vale paints melancholic landscapes inhabited by absurdist figures. Informed by the works of visionary writers such as Arthur Rimbaud and Lewis Carroll, and engaging with lyrical surrealism, Vale succeeds in transporting the viewer to an atmospheric plane of netherworldy experience.

It is within these netherworlds that Vale explores what he describes as ‘the mercurial moments of possibility in human affairs’, as enacted by his gloomy and irrational forms. Although engaging with the esoteric and the unearthly, Vale is driven to represent the complexity of human experience through his paintings. Themes of confusion, uncertainty and romantic strangeness abound in works that explore a sunset of the conscious mind.

Michael Vale is a visual artist, writer, curator and academic. In addition to exhibiting paintings, installations, photographs and video works he has also worked as a TV writer, scenery painter, interior designer, and art administrator. His scenic work can be seen in the Ghost Train at Luna Park, in St Kilda. In 2006 he completed his PhD at Monash University with a multi-media “art fiction” project entitled Le Chien qui Fume – A Smokey Life. In 2006 he was awarded Best Film on Art at the prestigious Asolo Artfilm Festival in northern Italy for a video work entitled The Long Walk. He has also been a finalist in the Archibald Prize on two occasions, with portraits of rock’n’roll musicians Dave Graney & Clare Moore in 2012, and Warren Ellis in 2013. He has held 21 solo exhibitions since 1986, as well as curating and participating in numerous group exhibitions and short film festivals. For the last twenty years has been teaching in art schools including Monash University, RMIT, and the Hong Kong Art School. He is currently a senior lecturer in Fine Art in the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture (MADA) at Monash University. His artworks are held in several public collections in Australia, as well as private collections in Australia and overseas.

Click here for more information on Michael Vale

Matt Coyle – Take Me Back To Sleep
Oct
7
Nov 6

Matt Coyle – Take Me Back To Sleep

Matt Coyle, Take Me Back To Sleep, 2016, Felt-tip pen, coloured pencil, gouache on paper, 52 x 70cms

Matt Coyle, Take Me Back To Sleep, 2016, Felt-tip pen, coloured pencil, gouache on paper, 52 x 70cms

OPENING NIGHT: FRIDAY 7 OCTOBER, 6-8PM
EXHIBITION: 7 OCTOBER – 5 NOVEMBER 2016

Hyperreal Illustrations Explore the Earthly and the Uncanny

With an almost draughtsman-like meticulousness, artist Matt Coyle produces hyperreal drawings that excavate the boundaries of the dream-state and the real.

Presenting astonishingly detailed investigations of the suburban and the everyday, Coyle infuses his works with elements of the uncanny. Exploring the symbolic potential of soil and earth, Coyle suggests something ominous about what can be revealed by digging through the surface.

Citing stillness and contemplation as central to his creative process Coyle states: ‘Looking out of the kitchen window every day, imagining miniature worlds in the foliage and beneath the rock walls, ideas for making artworks slowly emerge. There is time to contemplate… A pumpkin slowly rots and collapses around a garden gnome. Lemons ripen above a pile of splintered timber. I’m keeping an eye on these glacial transformations.’

Marking the artist’s return to exploring the full expanse of the page, the works in Coyle’s new show at Anna Pappas Gallery imbue the everyday with eerie, symbolic power. The presence of colour in Coyle’s new works emphasise characters, dwellings, and growth; central representations of Coyle’s focus on personal, domestic and ultimately human experience.

Matt Coyle was born in 1971, and grew up in Canberra. After a short stint at art school in Sydney, Coyle turned his attention to drawing and has been working within this medium ever since. Exhibiting regularly in Melbourne, Hobart and Sydney, Coyle has appeared in group shows internationally including the Hong Kong Art Fair and the Korean International Art Fair. He has work in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria and the Gallery of Modern Art/Queensland Art Gallery and has had numerous commissions including a suite of drawings for Art and Australia. Coyle has two published graphic novels “Worry Doll”, Dover Publications, 2016 and “Registry of Death”, Kitchen Sink Press 1996. He lives and works in Hobart, Tasmania.

Click here for more information on Matt Coyle

Marc Standing – The Oracles
Sep
2
Oct 2

Marc Standing – The Oracles

Marc Standing, Icon 2, 70 x 40 x 15cm, mixed media sculptur

Marc Standing, Icon 2, 70 x 40 x 15cm, mixed media sculptur

Opening Night: Friday, Sep 2, 6-8pm

Standing’s latest series The Oracles represents a departure from his more introspective search for identity in order to position himself within humankind’s age-old search for enlightenment. Each painting depicts a mythical world inhabited by transcendental beings and sacred artefacts yet grounded in the familiar patterns of nature. Hoodled figures rise up from the luscious undergrowth of the island while disembodied faces appear within a patchwork of pastel geometries and rocky outcrops. Through this complex layering of other-worldly textures and images Standing creates an isle of solitude and contemplation. Like the Oracles, Standing is motivated to create art as a means of revealing a “hidden knowledge” that inspires a more ethical and harmonious way of life.

Marc Standing holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honors) from the University of Cape Town, South Africa. His works have been shown extensively throughout Australia and have also been included in prominent Australian art prizes, as well as a commission work for The Groucho Club in London, a nominee for the Sovereign Asian Art Prize, and acquired by Artbank in Australia. His work has also been exhibited in New York, London, Holland, Hong Kong, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Standing has recently returned to Australia after several years living and working in Hong Kong.

View artist’s page

Basil Papoutsidis – Darlington Stripe
Sep
2
Oct 2

Basil Papoutsidis – Darlington Stripe

Basil Papoutsidis, Hemi, 2016, steel, PVC, pine, enamel and acrylic on MDF, 110 x 110cm,

Basil Papoutsidis, Hemi, 2016, steel, PVC, pine, enamel and acrylic on MDF, 110 x 110cm,

Opening Night: Friday, Sep 2, 6-8pm

In the world of NASCAR, the American auto racing empire, there is no such thing as an easy race and the Darlington Raceway is no exception. The “Darlington Stripe”, a phrase well-known amongst NASCAR circles, refers to the black mark or dented sheet metal that ensues from an encounter with the outside wall of the toughest track. For drivers is to be worn like a badge of honour. On the racetrack these spectacular machines become objects of considerable speed and strength, it is here that Papoutsidis’ affinity for materiality and motion is borne.

Interested in the sculptural and post-painterly contexts of formalist abstraction, Papoutsidis utilises the form and texture of automotive materials – from powder-coated steel to PVC and enamel – to create bold minimalist constructions that embody a sense of movement. Fractured steel lines, powder coated in primary colours; geometric forms adorned with automotive offcuts; PVC pipes lodged at obtrusive angles, these structures act as ‘vehicles’ repurposing classic automotive principals to reflect upon new methods of construction. While seemingly arbitrary in composition, each work is meticulously designed, and built according to a specific hierarchical structure, a Darlington Stripe for the beauty of honest construction.

Graduating from the Victorian College of the Arts with a Bachelor of Fine Art in 2014, Basil Papoutsidis has held several solo shows, including Camber at C3 Art Space, Melbourne (2016), Livery at Nicholas Projects, Melbourne (2016), Sunday Ride at Seventh Gallery, Melbourne (2016) and Auto Salon at Kings Artist-run, Melbourne (2015). He has also exhibited at the International Mokuhanga Conference – Geidai in Tokyo, Japan (2014) and his work is represented in a number of private and public collections, including the Epworth Hospital, Melbourne.

Jayne Dyer – Sharpness
Jul
29
Aug 28

Jayne Dyer – Sharpness

Jayne Dyer , Last Things, 2016 (installation shot, Bury Art Museum)

Jayne Dyer , Last Things, 2016 (installation shot, Bury Art Museum)

Opening night: Friday, July 29, 6-8 pm

Sharpness continues Jayne Dyer’s investigation of imminent states of collapse through a series of small-scale candy coloured objects. Corporeal tensions are implicit in these abject forms. Behaving like bodily matter – clinging to shelves, spilling onto the gallery floor –they appear delicate and beautiful and at the same time familiar and visibly uncomfortable. Are these fleshy malformed objects prototypes of our future DNA?

About Jayne Dyer
Currently based in Lisboa, Portugal, Jayne Dyer is recognized world-wide for her diverse and socially engaged projects, having been invited to participate in Conceiving Space, for the 2016 Colombo Art Biennale, Sri Lanka. Dyer has also received the inaugural Individual Artist Award from the Australian Federal Government for arts achievements in Asia (2013) for her expansive work The Butterfly Effect, the centerpiece of the Four Seasons Beijing.

Dyer’s interdisciplinary practice spans Australia and Asia, and increasingly east and west Europe. Recent exhibitions include Ger to Ger, Mongolia National Art Gallery, Ulaanbaatar; The protest that never ends, ARTISTERIUM 5, Tbilisi; The Butterfy Effect, ARTBosphorus, Istanbul; URS27, a Taipei City Urban Redevelopment initiative; postEDEN, Today Art Museum, Beijing; and Spill, Kuandu Museum of Fine Arts, Taipei. Dyer has also collaborated with British artist Wayne Warren on a major installation Last Things, at the Bury Art Museum, England (2016) and It’s closing time for gardens of the west, at the 56th Venice Biennale for Personal Structures-Crossing Borders, Palazzo Mora, Venice (2015).

View artist’s page

Joanna Logue – Reveries
Jul
29
Aug 28

Joanna Logue – Reveries

Joanna Logue, Fish river dreaming I, 2016, oil-on-linen, 120x240cm, 

Joanna Logue, Fish river dreaming I, 2016, oil-on-linen, 120x240cm, 

Opening Night: Friday, Jul 29, 6-8pm

Having recently relocated from country New South Wales to inner-city Melbourne, Joanna Logue experienced a deep nostalgia for the land surrounding her former home. Logue’s landscape is warm and comforting, a moment of solace, set apart from the tumultuous cityscape of Melbourne. Referencing her own visceral memories and personal histories, Logue explores how memory might inform the spirit of the painting. Paring down the landscape to a deeper level of abstraction, the work escapes its painterly surface to reflect the culmination of all the landscapes the artist has visited over her lifetime and a vision of the ones yet to be experienced – paintings imagined out of a dream or reverie.

About Joanna Logue
Through a languorous yet lively application of paint, Joanna Logue reimagines the Australian landscape for today. It is this new romanticism that has seen her be included in Country and Western, a national showcase of Australian Landscape painters from the bi-centennial year to present day. Having opened in May at Townsville Regional Gallery, the show will tour nationally throughout 2016. Her paintings have also been shown as part of New Romantics at the Gippsland Regional Gallery (2011) and The Feminine Optic – Perspectives on Landscape, curated by Andrew Frost at the Tamworth Regional Art Gallery (2013).

Born in 1964 in Scone, NSW, Logue received her BA in Visual Arts from the City Art Institute, Sydney. In 2006, she was awarded the Country Energy Prize and in 2009 she received the Central West Regional Artist Award. Logue’s works are represented in numerous collections including Barclays Bank, Bathurst Regional Gallery, Cornell University, Macquarie Bank, University of NSW, Pat Corrigan Collection and Qantas.

View artist’s page

Rod Moss – The Origin of the New Poetics
May
13
Jun 19

Rod Moss – The Origin of the New Poetics

Rod Moss, The Gift of Butterflies, 2015, 90 x 125cm

Rod Moss, The Gift of Butterflies, 2015, 90 x 125cm

Rod Moss has lived in the Aboriginal community, Whitegate on the eastern fringes of Alice Springs, for almost three decades, forging close ties with the community. Breaking the barriers of what Moss considers “a politically correct, insulating silence” within the Australian art scene, Origin of the New Poetics depicts the people of Whitegate in extraordinarily personal, vulnerable and private moments.

Moss’ narrative paintings show resolute scenes in which the impact of alcohol and violence are unflinchingly depicted, contrasted with tender moments showing cultural milestones and family rituals. Appropriating compositions from the Old Masters and religious paintings, his artworks are familiar yet foreign, romantic yet confronting.

This is Moss’ fourth solo exhibition with Anna Pappas Gallery. Moss was awarded the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Non-fiction in 2011 for his first memoir The Hard Light of Day. Moss’s second memoir, One Thousand Cuts: Life and Art in Central Australia was launched in conjunction with a retrospective exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery in 2013

Click here for more information on Rod Moss

Click here to view catalogue

Jack Rowland – Alternative Territories
May
13
Jun 19

Jack Rowland – Alternative Territories

Jack Rowland, Ormiston Gorge, 2015, oil on linen, 110 x 140cm

Jack Rowland, Ormiston Gorge, 2015, oil on linen, 110 x 140cm

Jack Rowland’s third solo exhibition Alternative Territories, is inspired by the artist’s recent journey through outback Australia. For Rowland, exploring unfamiliar territories fostered a deeper engagement with the land and created new ways of interpreting the physical and inner reality.

Visualising the notion of altered perception through his psychedelic aesthetic, Rowland transforms the familiar earthly environment into an otherworldly landscape, inviting us to see the world around in a Utopian light. Through the vibrancy of his palette, Rowland celebrates the beauty of the natural world, and by extension, enriches our perception of reality.

Click here for more information on Jack Rowland

Claire Anna Watson – Endocardium
Apr
1
May 8

Claire Anna Watson – Endocardium

Claire Anna Watson, Endocardium, 2010 (video still) HD video, 1920 x 1080p 3 minutes 4 seconds

Claire Anna Watson, Endocardium, 2010 (video still) HD video, 1920 x 1080p 3 minutes 4 seconds

In Claire Anna Watson’s work, Endocardium, the cabbage, a mundane and uninteresting vegetable, holds the artist’s fascination as a sculptural object. Unveiling its gnarled and freakish core, through a systematic unwrapping, Watson exposes this most banal of vegetables to know it more intimately.

Multidisciplinary in approach, Watson’s practice explores aspects of contemporary culture and its relationship to foodstuffs and the impact of scientific interventions on the natural world. Ephemeral matter is the medium for manipulation and experimentation, recontextualised to invite the viewer into a state of reflection on the natural, or not so natural, world. With each procedure, Watson increases her understanding of the world through discovering both the exhilarating and inane.

Claire Anna Watson is a Melbourne based artist, curator, and arts writer. She creates installations, photography and video-based artwork, and has devised public art projects for the shores of the Black Sea in Turkey, a forest in Finland, the rural plains of Portugal and the snowfields of Australia.

Michael Prior – Slow Air
Apr
1
May 8

Michael Prior – Slow Air

Michael Prior, Slow Air, Mixed media (installation view

Michael Prior, Slow Air, Mixed media (installation view

Michael Prior works across several disciplines to create works that are tactile, immersive and playful, allowing chance elements to emerge within fixed structures. Slow Air, is an installation of ephemeral and responsive works. For this exhibition, Prior’s sculptural devices focus on unseen forces at play, composing them into layers of sounds and gestures with actions and reactions, causes and consequences. The work in Slow Air consists of mechanical sculptures, multiple sound sources and video. Applying playful spontaneity to the material, objects are activated to create a network of rhythm, gestures and relationships.

Prior’s works activate materials in unexpected ways to create self-generating compositions of motion and sound. Elements emerge from a process of play, improvising with materials to explore their innate properties. Prior investigates the behaviour of the object rather the object itself, uncovering universal patterns.

Project 16: The Agency of Things
Feb
19
Mar 27

Project 16: The Agency of Things

Melanie Upton, Stacked, 2015, Timber, cement, plaster, powder pigment, foil, paper, plasticene, polystyrene, besser block, acrylic, enamel, steel, clamp, dimensions variable

Melanie Upton, Stacked, 2015, Timber, cement, plaster, powder pigment, foil, paper, plasticene, polystyrene, besser block, acrylic, enamel, steel, clamp, dimensions variable

Curated by Kent Wilson

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 19 FEBRUARY, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 19 FEBRUARY – 26 MARCH, 2015

Held in February each year, the Project exhibition series at Anna Pappas Gallery has become a stand out event of the Melbourne art scene. Project 16: The Agency of Things will bring together artists Sarah Contos, Chris Dolman, Betra Fraval, Michaela Gleave, Justin Hinder, Zoe Kirkwood, Sam Leach, Melanie Upton and Mark Whalen, under the curatorship of Kent Wilson, Assistant Curator at the Town Hall Gallery.

Featuring a selection of artists working across a variety of mediums, The Agency of Things is at once a rallying cry for the life of objects and a celebration of the networked nature of our reality. Artists based in Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Los Angeles have been drawn together for the next instalment of the Anna Pappas Gallery Project series. All chosen for their capacity to carefully marry conceptual rigour with material acuity, the exhibition promises to provide a sweeping insight into the ideas driving Australian contemporary art.

Proponents of art have faith in the idea that the things we call art propel themselves into the world with something akin to a life of their own. That objects, materials and evidence of process have agency to affect their immediate environment and influence the world of which they are a part. The Agency of Things is an exhibition that takes this notion as its premise, an exploration into the idea that the non-human elements of the universe may well have the sort of agency we normally only attribute to the conscious choices made by humans.

Originally from Perth, Sydney-based artist Sarah Contos completed a Masters of Art at the College of Fine Arts, Sydney in 2010. She has held several solo exhibitions as well as being included in group shows – including Future Primitive, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne (2013–2014) – building a name for her sensual forays into soft sculpture, embroidered images and quilted works that broach multiple pop-cultural, personal and art-historical strains and references. Merging the totemic with the kinky and the historical with science-fiction, Contos works with her materials to draw out emotional and psychological resonances from deep within.

Chris Dolman’s practice uses the formalist Modernist tropes with an irreverent and self-deprecating humour. Moving across painting, printmaking, ceramics and video, and drawing on the histories of geometric abstraction, Pop, and Surrealism, Dolman employs non-traditional self-portraiture to explore absurd notions of identity and themes of loss and failure.

Dolman graduated from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2010. He was the recipient of the Wallara Travelling Scholarship, as well as New Work (early career) and ArtStart grants from the Australia Council for the Arts. He has undertaken residencies at Hill End, Bundanon Trust, BigCi NSW, Ceramic Design Studio (Sydney Institute), and St George Institute of TAFE. He has exhibited nationally including shows at Alaska projects, Firstdraft, West Space, Seventh, FELTspace, Wellington St projects, MOP projects and [MARS]. Dolman runs the project gallery TWENTY THIRTYSEVEN, and is currently a research candidate at Sydney College of Arts, with an Australian Post Graduate Award from Sydney University.

Justin Hinder is an emerging artist, writer and curator based in Melbourne. His practice investigates human movement and the decision making process. Hinder’s interest lies in combining daily normalities with ideals of pre-determined destiny and storytelling. He explores ideas of satisfaction of self by focusing on the everyday – acknowledging the cause and effect of idiosyncratic thoughts, decisions and actions.

Zoe Kirkwood works in an ever-expanding painting practice. Generally taking the form of large-scale installations, her work traverses a range of media to create visually engulfing worlds. At the center of her practice is an interest in the spatial qualities of painting and a relentless desire to investigate new ways in which painting can move into the physical space of the viewer.

Kirkwood is an emerging artist based in Adelaide, South Australia. She graduated with first class Honours in Visual Arts in 2013 from the UniSA. She has been involved in numerous exhibitions locally and interstate and in 2015 travelled to New York to exhibit with CHASM Gallery. She is the recipient of a number of prizes including the prestigious Doctor Harold Schenberg Art Prize, 2014; The Helpmann Academy and Hill Smith Travelling Art Prize, 2014 and The Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Prize, 2013. Her work has been shown at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, MARS Gallery, Canberra Contemporary Art Space, FELT Space, Hugo Michel Gallery and the Contemporary Art Centre of SA.

Sam Leach’s virtuosic oil paintings are thematically and stylistically informed by the traditions of 17th century Dutch painting. His mimetic works conflate the poles of the metaphorical and the empirical, the analogous and the objective, in an ongoing investigation of the relationship between humans and animals. While the delicate interplay between formalist figuration and modernist abstraction in his paintings operates on one level to distance the viewer – to encourage them to look objectively at the subjects – on another level each animal depicted has a symbolic currency that resonates with the audience on a personal level. The paintings extend their focus on animal life to the spectrum of all life itself, encouraging the viewer to contemplate their role as living creatures on this shared earth.

2015 will see Sam Leach feature in ‘Time Space Existence’ as a collateral event of the Venice Biennale, and a major monograph with essays by Andrew Frost and esteemed fiction writer Tim Winton. In 2010 Leach won both Wynne and Archibald Prizes at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, and he was a finalist for the Royal Bank of Scotland Emerging Artist Award in 2009. His work has been extensively exhibited nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include Sam Leach, Future Perfect, Singapore, 2013; The Ecstasy of Infrastructure, TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria, 2012 and Cosmists, 24HR ART, Northern Territory of Contemporary Art, Darwin, 2010. Leach was recently included in the group shows Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2013; SkyLab, La Trobe Regional Gallery, Victoria, 2013; Haunts and Follies, Linden Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2012 and First Life Residency in Landscape at Xin Dong Cheng Space for Contemporary Art, Beijing, 2011.

Melanie Upton is an artist working across sculpture, installation and 2 dimensional media. Exploring the intersection between the natural and built environment, Melanie’s work is invested in an investigation of material. She finds inspiration in the urban and natural spaces around us, the evolving process of decay and renewal, spatial evolution, and the inherent power of things.

Upton graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Art from the VCA in 2006 and has shown in group and solo exhibitions throughout Melbourne and Brisbane. In 2015 Upton ‘s sculptures were featured as part of a collaboration with Australian accessories label Mimco, she undertook research in New York and was also published in Scottish online journal ‘Unthunk’. She is a recipient of local and federal government grants and has been awarded the Dr Rosenthal Award for Sculpture, the National Gallery Women’s Association Encouragement Award and the George Tallis Foundation prize.

In Mark Whalen’s work science, geometry, illustrated perspective and construction are depicted in outer space environments, as if an alternate universe is starting from scratch. Since 2006, Whalen’s work has been exhibited in Los Angeles, London, Berlin, Italy and Australia. He was included in 2009’s Apocalypse Wow! exhibition at MACRO Museum of Contemporary Art in Rome and more recently SPACE INVADERS at the National Gallery of Australia. Whalen has appeared in numerous publications such as Juxtapoz, Modart Europe, Arkitip, Nylon, Artist Profile, Australian Art Collector and Monster Children. His work was recently animated for Autolux’s film clip of their single ‘The Science of Imaginary Solutions’. His work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, Art Bank and Mainland Art collections.

Click here for more information on Michaela Gleave.

Project 16: The Agency of Things is presented courtesy of Roslyn Oxley 9 Gallery, Sydney; Galerie pompom, Sydney; Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney and blackartprojects, Melbourne.

Group Show 2015 – Various Artists
Dec
11
Dec 24

Group Show 2015 – Various Artists

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World: Russian Ruble - Ukrainian Hryvnia 21-11-13 - 31-8-15, 2015, ink on rag paper, unique state mechanical drawing, 70x70cm

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World: Russian Ruble - Ukrainian Hryvnia 21-11-13 - 31-8-15, 2015, ink on rag paper, unique state mechanical drawing, 70x70cm

Another year of fabulous exhibitions has come to an end. Join us in a celebration of our diverse stable, the festive season and wave goodbye to 2015.

Artists include: Emma Coulter, Matt Coyle, Sue Dodd, Betra Fraval, Sam Grigorian, Samuel Hodge, Troy Innocent, Benjamin Lichtenstein, Joanna Logue, Simon MacEwan, Gian Manik, Ian Paradine, Steaphan Paton, David Ray, Jack Rowland, Marc Standing, Kāryn Taylor, Justin Williams & Jarek Wojcik.

Betra Fraval — Falling into the Sky
Nov
6
Dec 6

Betra Fraval — Falling into the Sky

Betra Fraval, Beam, 2015, oil on linen, 91 x 81cm

Betra Fraval, Beam, 2015, oil on linen, 91 x 81cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 6 NOVEMBER – 5 DECEMBER, 2015

“It is just one small step from Earth-matter to Space-light. A leap or a take-off able to free us for a moment from gravity.” — Paul Virilio

Betra Fraval is a UK-born, Melbourne-based artist whose installation and painting practice explores the transient nature of all forms. Fraval’s works explore moments when grand monuments fade and dissolve. Her delicate imagery portrays softly rendered ruptures and disconnections.

For her solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Fraval will present an installation where the viewer can interact with a central sculpture, as well as a series of works on paper and canvas. The installation explores forces that direct human experiences and interactions with the world. Driven by Fraval’s intense curiosity, her work unites art, science and subjective experiences.

Our everyday lives are a performance, held in place by the hidden structure of perceived safety, and against the ever-present awareness of time. An attempt to take flight, together with elements of the trapeze – an apparatus ready for playful performance – is a recurring theme in the work. Our trust is placed in the invisible net, waiting below.

Graduating from the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA), Melbourne Australia in 2014, Fraval was the recipient of the annual Galloway Lawson Prize for Excellence; Tolarno Art Prize; The Maude Glover Flea Award; and The Seventh Gallery Exhibition Grant (Making Space ARI Festival 2007). She was shortlisted for the Elisabeth Murdoch Traveling Fellowship in 2009 and received a residency at Sanskriti Kendra, New Delhi, India. Selected solo exhibitions include: The Rope Doesn’t Hang, The Earth Pulls, 2015, Five Walls, Melbourne; Still Remains, 2013, c3 Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne; The Dead Trees Gives No Shelter, 2012, Linden New Art, Melbourne; Unstable Ground, 2008, Victoria Park Gallery, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include McClelland Sculpture Prize, 2014,McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery, Langwarrin; Disappear, 2011, Kings ARI, Melbourne; A4 Art, 2011 West Space, Melbourne and Forged, 2010, Trocadero Gallery, Melbourne.

Sue Dodd — Travelogue Super Uncertain
Nov
5
Dec 6

Sue Dodd — Travelogue Super Uncertain

Sue Dodd, The Other Side, 2015, production still, dimensions variable

Sue Dodd, The Other Side, 2015, production still, dimensions variable

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 6 NOVEMBER – 5 DECEMBER, 2015

For her upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Sue Dodd will create a series of performative video, song, and animation works exploring the theme of travel, leisure and technology, taking the viewer on a desperate imaginary trip to nowhere. Mimicking the constructs of commercial music videos and production stills, Dodd will create simulated hallucinogenic journeys with hyper-real, almost toxic colours and visual effects. Through these works, Dodd is playfully interrogating notions of leisure and escapism and questioning the construction/s of identity within consumer culture.

Dodd’s practice incorporates performance, music, video and installation, and responds to the contemporary cultural landscape of globalisation, homogeneity and desire. Dodd looks at the playful and expressive potentials of pop, mass media and celebrity culture to challenge audience relationships to the artwork and demonstrate possibilities for hybrid modes of production.

Selected solo exhibitions include: Wendy Airhole, 2013 Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Technopia Tours w Kim Donaldson, 2013, Art Stage Singapore, Singapore (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); Best of: A Survey of Gossip Pop, 2013 Techno Park Studios, Melbourne; Watch Me Buy Me, 2009, ACMI, Melbourne.

Selected group exhibitions include: Art Athina Contemporaries: Statements Made, 2014, curated by Artemis Potamianou, Athens (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); MAF Video Program: Staging Actions, 2014, curated by Kyle Weise and Simone Hine, Melbourne Art Fair (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); Don’t Kurt Cobain, 2014, curated by Lisa Radford and Rosemary Forde, Slopes, Melbourne; AwesomeRepeatxInfinityBonus;-), 2014 curated by Sue Dodd, Trocadero, Melbourne; Moving on Asia: Towards a New Art Network 2004-2013, 2013, City Gallery, Auckland; Move On Asia: Video Art in Asia, 2002-2012, 2013, ZKM, Karlsruhe; My Avante-Garde is Bigger Than Yours, 2013, Kings, Melbourne; Now Hear This – Melbourne Now, 2013, National Gallery of Victoria; This Is Not A Love Song, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Technopia Tours, 2012, StudioVisits, Berlin; Frame_Birmingham, 2012, Clarke Gallery, Birmingham; Pursuit, 2012, Delhi Art Fair; Significant Others, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne Art Fair; Radio Alice, 2012, Margaret Lawrence Gallery, VCA, Melbourne.

Michaela Gleave + Cameron Robbins — Lines of Sight
Oct
9
Nov 1

Michaela Gleave + Cameron Robbins — Lines of Sight

Michaela Gleave, Eclipse Machine (Retograde Motion), 2015, projection lamp, motors, prisms, timber, stand, 70 x 70 x 140cm

Michaela Gleave, Eclipse Machine (Retograde Motion), 2015, projection lamp, motors, prisms, timber, stand, 70 x 70 x 140cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 9 – 31 OCTOBER, 2015

SPECIAL EVENT: Occulation of Venus astronomical viewing at 4:00am | October 9 | Royal Park, Parkville. Click here for more information.

Lines of Sight is a collaborative exhibition by Michaela Gleave and Cameron Robbins. For these two artists, the cosmological and ephemeral have been long-standing interests. For their exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Gleave and Robbins will create individual works, as well as a collaborative piece.

Utilising tricks of perception and relationships between space, matter and time, Gleave investigates the systems and structures that construct our everyday reality. Her installations are immersive and atmospheric, and rely on the viewers’ relationship with their surroundings, often mimicking the organic construct of natural phenomena.

Robbins will exhibit a new series of wind and light photographs which continue his interest in unpredictability and chaos, but also the rhythm and patterns of nature. Robbins will continue his enthusiasm for site-responsive kinetic sculptures with his work in Lines of Sight.

The interests of these two artists perfectly align to create a charged exhibition.

Michaela Gleave holds a Master of Fine Arts (Research) from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales and completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at the School of Art, University of Tasmania. Selected solo exhibitions include A Day is Longer Than a Year, 2013, Fremantle Arts Centre, Fremantle; Into the Aether, 2013, MCA Art Bar – Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; and We Are Made of Stardust, 2012, Hong Kong International Art Fair, Hong Kong. Selected group exhibitions include Experimenta: Recharge, 2015, RMIT Gallery, touring exhibition; Elemental Phenomena, 2015, Griffith University Art Gallery, Brisbane; Project 15 DEATH / LIFE, 2015, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; New Worlds: Science Fiction & Contemporary Art, 2014, CoFA Galleries, Sydney; and Trace: Performative Works from the Collection, 2014, The Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane. Gleave has completed residencies in New York, Tokyo and Berlin, and is held in private collections in Australia, Germany and the UK.

Cameron Robbins has been a practicing artist for 25 years. Selected solo exhibitions include Var Jevn Dogn Equinox, 2015, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; The Red Queen, 2014, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart; and Melbourne Now, 2013-14, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions, such as Motorenwerke, 2015, Galerie oqbo, Berlin; FreeRange, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; and the Hong Kong, and Korean International Art Fair’s in 2011. Robbin’s work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, and Scienceworks, Museum of Victoria, amongst others.

Kᾱryn Taylor — Immaterial Alchemy
Sep
3
Oct 4

Kᾱryn Taylor — Immaterial Alchemy

Karyn Taylor, Time Loop In 2 Parts, 2015, Perspex, 70 x 42 x 6.5cm

Karyn Taylor, Time Loop In 2 Parts, 2015, Perspex, 70 x 42 x 6.5cm

Immaterial Alchemy reflects Kᾱryn Taylor’s deeper engagement with materiality and potentiality. Referencing formalism in its minimalist style, her work inhabits a space that exists between the material and the immaterial, cognition and precognition, ontology and epistemology.

Simon MacEwan — The Floating World
Sep
3
Oct 5

Simon MacEwan — The Floating World

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World, 2015, drawing machine, 120 x 120 x 110cm (Programming, and automation assistance, by Finn Robertson)

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World, 2015, drawing machine, 120 x 120 x 110cm (Programming, and automation assistance, by Finn Robertson)

OPENING DRINKS: THURSDAY 3 SEPTEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 3 SEPTEMBER – 3 OCTOBER, 2015
ARTIST TALK: SATURDAY 19 SEPTEMBER, 1PM

Simon MacEwan’s The Floating World traces parallels between the history of currency and modernist artistic strategies.

In the centre of the room a drawing machine operates; inside the steel structure gears slowly turn, bearings roll and counterweights tremble as a pivoting arm drags a pen in a looping curve across a sheet of paper. As the pen draws, the table that holds the paper slowly revolves, and as it turns the loop becomes a spiral; a curving grid that falls back on itself as the pen describes the subtly varying orbits of the drawing arm.

Money
In the 19th century, as money changed from gold to the promise of gold in the form of paper notes, it became necessary to take ever greater measures against forgery, and soengineers developed geometric lathes to make patterns so complex and delicate that without the original machine and the secret of its settings they would prove impossible to copy.

This form of encryption became the visual language of paper currency, and though it now exists only as anachronistic decoration, the idea continues in other forms; in a world where money is largely immaterial, it inhabits the secret numbers of encryption algorithms that verify and protect electronic transactions, finding its purest expression in currencies like Bitcoin .

Art
Roughly concurrent with the shifts of money, from material object fixed in time and space, to virtual commodity, there is a parallel transformation in the history of art. Starting with the early-modern break from representation and carrying through to the development of conceptual art, artists have resisted authorship and the creation of singular art objects.

This movement is characterised by a dual retreat; the artist becomes further removed from the physical production of the artwork; employing others to perform the creation of the works, such as Andy Warhol’s Serigraphs or more, recently the work of Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst. At the same time there are artists who use strategies of seriality undermine authorship and singular creative acts, setting parameters where the series of works that result are the products of an initial score, and function only in relation to each other as a series.

Art works themselves become less and less tied to the specificity of physical objects and locations, as in the art of Sol LeWitt where the work exists as the possibility of its execution according to a particular set of instructions in a space designated by whoever has purchased the right to have those instructions enacted.

Art + Money
As money becomes immaterial, traded at immense speeds across huge distances, it also becomes exquisitely sensitive, like a seismograph tracking the spread of news and the hunches of stockbrokers, and so the asocial and anti-historical qualities of currency exchange ultimately make it beholden to the social and the local. Similarly, the dematerialised LeWitt work becomes inextricable from the web of dependencies that

underpin its existence as a work of art; from the documents of ownership, loan agreements and instructions for execution, to the institutional spaces and surfaces where it appears, and the social and professional networks that gather the people to do the physical labour of manifesting the work.

In the end there is no escape from the physical, as both art and currency leave the bounds or their own objects, they don’t cease to exist, instead they inhere in other places, distributed across server hard drives, optic fibres, documents and in the bodies of those who interact with them.

The Floating World draws on these histories of dematerialisation of both money and art.  Based on the principles of 19th century geometric lathes, the mechanisms of the drawing machine trace patterns across the paper that resemble the ornaments still found on banknotes, but the movements of the machine are computer drawing information from currency exchange data. The drawing machine transforms the stream of stock ticker numbers into slow arabesques, and the regularity of this pattern depends on the stability of the currencies charted; as the exchange rate shifts so does the pattern, and so the language of the stability of money becomes a device to describe its contingency and instability. The Floating World makes art of commerce, cryptically graphing the impact of events and ideas in the ripples they make in the flow of numbers of international exchange markets, paper notes of the space between money.

Simon MacEwan holds a Bachelor of Fine Art (Sculpture) from RMIT, Melbourne, a Diploma of Visual Art from RMIT, Melbourne and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Melbourne. MacEwan has exhibited with Anna Pappas Gallery since 2008. Selected solo exhibitions include: all that is solid melts into air, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; The World’s Fair, 2011, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; You’re doing it wrong, 2010, c3 contemporary art space, Melbourne, Batmania, 2009, Bus gallery, Melbourne, built to fail, 2005, Seventh Gallery, Melbourne and lost in the woods, 2004, Seventh Gallery, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include: Melbourne Art Fair, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Farewell 2013, 2013, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Others, 2013, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Duality: Banyule Award for Works on Paper (Highly Commended), 2011, project11, 2011, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Banyule City Council, Melbourne, Grow Wild, 2008, Utopian Slumps, Melbourne, Lost Garden Found, 2006, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne and Where the Wild Things Are, 2005, UTS Gallery, Sydney. MacEwan’s works are held in numerous collections including Artbank, the Banyule City Council and private collections in Australia.

Benjamin Lichtenstein — Living in Oblivion
Aug
7
Aug 30

Benjamin Lichtenstein — Living in Oblivion

Benjamin Lichtenstein, It's like a brothel in here, 2015, unique state silver gelatin print, 84 x 119cm

Benjamin Lichtenstein, It's like a brothel in here, 2015, unique state silver gelatin print, 84 x 119cm

OPENING DRINKS: Friday 7 August, 6pm

EXHIBITION: 7 August – 29 August, 2015

Benjamin Lichtenstein does not simply take photographs – he creates them. For this young, upcoming artist, the process does not end at the camera, but extends to the darkroom and beyond. Manipulating the images by hand, strong lines and restrained patterns begin to arise. Merging photography with collage and drawing, the surface of the image is blended to the point where the original medium is no longer recognisable.

For his solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Lichtenstein will present a new body of monochromatic works. The multi-panelled compositions embody the artist’s unique imagery through painting masks in the darkroom printing process. Living in Oblivion is Lichtenstein’s most ambitious body of work to date, exceeding the usual dimensions of his work and pushing the limits during the printing process. Living in Oblivion references the film of the same name, described as ‘a film about filmmaking’, alluding to Lichtenstein’s technical proficiency and experimentation with photography as a medium.

Lichtenstein’s images capture the hand of the artist in a way the medium usually denies. The resulting monochromatic creations are unique prints, each work personifying an intimate and distinctive vision.

Lichtenstein holds a Bachelor of Fine Art, Photography, from the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne. Selected solo exhibitions include Flower, 2015, Fort Delta, Melbourne; Paperwork, 2014, 136 Johnston Street, Melbourne; Crescent, 2014, Neospace, Melbourne; Run, Warwick Baker, 2013, The John and Marion Frye Collection, Los Angeles; and I Know You Will Be Happy Here, 2013, Utopian Slumps Project Room, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include View From the Window, 2014, Edmund Pearce; Mental, 2014, Muddguts, New York City; Das Boot Fair, 2014, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne; and This Has Been, 2013, c3 Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne. Lichtenstein has also been a finalist in the Bowness Prize, for Run, Warwick Baker #3, 2013, and recipient of the Kodak Salon at the Centre for Contemporary Photography (Excellence in Photomedia) for Saturday night’s alright, 2006.

Gian Manik — Umbrella
Aug
7
Aug 30

Gian Manik — Umbrella

Gian Manik, Untitled 14 (detail), 2015, oil on canvas, 137 x 152.5cm

Gian Manik, Untitled 14 (detail), 2015, oil on canvas, 137 x 152.5cm

OPENING DRINKS: Friday 7 August, 6pm

EXHIBITION: 7 – 29 August, 2015

Gian Manik’s work is highly conceptual and deeply rooted in materiality. His creative process stems from his artistic materials, which act as a springboard for imagined systems or structures. The potential for creation is the driving force; a space of growth and of bringing something into existence is essential.

For his solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Manik will present a new body of work that continues his engagement with painting images of mirrored surfaces. The works are rooted in an element of chance, as the subjects of his paintings are dependent on what appears in the reflection. This includes abstracted images of the artist’s body, windows, walls and even other paintings in the studio. Worlds within worlds are created and manipulated, and what is produced on the canvas arrives through multifaceted pathways.

Manik explores the liminal space that exists when numerous visual devices are utilised. The space ‘in between’ also exists in the physical realm, between the mirror, the object, the painter and the canvas. These elements vibrate and coalesce into an image that transcribes the essence of the artist’s environment.

Manik holds a Master of Fine Arts from Monash University, and completed his Bachelor of Arts, Visual Arts (Honours) at Curtin University of Technology. Selected solo exhibitions include Big Recorder, 2013, Alaska Projects, Sydney; The Retreat to Representation, 2012, Venn Gallery, Perth; and Decorative Backings, 2011, Artbeat, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include Fresh Paint, 2013, Melbourne Pool, Compound Interest, Melbourne; and Joondalup Invitation Art Award Exhibition, 2009, Lakeside Complex, Joondalup. Manik has also held residencies at the Gunnery Artspace, Sydney, 2009, and at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, 2008.

Justin Williams — Stained Mountain
Jul
3
Aug 2

Justin Williams — Stained Mountain

Justin Williams, Baba Desi, 2015, oil on paper, 43 x 53cm

Justin Williams, Baba Desi, 2015, oil on paper, 43 x 53cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 3 JULY, 6PM

EXHIBITION: 3 JULY – 1 AUGUST 2015

Justin Williams creates work that is quietly mystical. It reaches us from a place of subversive beauty, where urban legends and local stories contain strange and wonderful characters. It is these characters that interest and inform a new body of sculptures and paintings, which delve into the mysteries of the mountain where Williams lives and works.

For his upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Justin Williams is presenting an exploration into concepts and constructions of beauty. Stained Mountain investigates people and myths, such as the disappearance and suspected murder of celebrity chef, Willi Koeppen in 1976, and the colourful character known simply as The Wizard of Belgrave, Baba Desi – an activist, humanist and local icon who adorns himself in flowing robes and jewellery.

The beauty within the grotesque interests Williams greatly, weaving through stories that surround these local figures. This idyllic location in the mountain ranges contains sometimes unpleasant, yet always enigmatic figures that exist in an ever-shrinking space, outside of society’s eye.

Raw and honest, Williams is delving into the internal struggle of the duality between light and dark, beauty and hostility, legends and truth; these works are both finished, yet unfinished, as are the people and stories that inform them. His paintings reveal landscapes shimmering in a space between public and hidden worlds; his sculptures speak of characters living within the confines of an almost smothering forest.

Justin Williams holds a Bachelor of Communication and Design, Majoring in Printmaking and Illustration from Swinburn University. He has held numerous solo exhibitions including Viridian, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery; Mountain I Miss You, 2013, Mild Manner, Brisbane; A Touch of Norway, 2012, Lapis Lazuli Pop Up Factory Gallery, Melbourne. His selected group exhibitions include at the Melbourne Art Fair in 2014; Project 14: Free Range, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery; Trouble in Paradise, 2012, Paradise Hills Gallery, Melbourne; and Group Show, 2012, Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne. He has been featured in Artist Profile, Australian Creative and New York Arts Magazine.

Jarek Wojcik — Spaces and Things
Jul
3
Aug 1

Jarek Wojcik — Spaces and Things

Jarek Wojcik, Ambient, 2015, acrylic on linen, 168 x 198 cm

Jarek Wojcik, Ambient, 2015, acrylic on linen, 168 x 198 cm

Space and Things is a journey into a world of hyper-realistic images that cannot, in fact, be real. These works invite the viewer to travel through the narrative, finding links and images that seem familiar, yet slightly puzzling.

Rich in their imagery, illuminated almost by candlelight, Wojcik transports the viewer to an enchanting and surreal place. The paintings will explore the perception of a Nuevo Riche, clichéd in its obsession with trophies and image, and deeply rooted in a historical understanding of bourgeois culture, yet existing in a modern environment. These are not classical paintings, but in fact a whimsical take on the historical; painting things in spaces, Wojcik’s Spaces and Things is a little bit tongue in cheek.

The painted scenes are not necessarily real or physical, but a mental landscape where one can freely imagine and create. Wojcik responds to his surroundings in this way and through the study of history, resulting in something that feels as though remembered from a distant past, yet vigorously new. In conversation with reality and imagination, a combination of both exists in this opulently detailed work; the audience is drawn in and the imagination is intrigued to believe wholeheartedly in this world – until we are reminded by Wojcik’s wit, that it is, nevertheless, satire.

Troy Innocent — New Abstraction
May
15
Jun 28

Troy Innocent — New Abstraction

Troy Innocent, Delta, 2014, laser cut plywood and acrylic, 66 x 89cm

Troy Innocent, Delta, 2014, laser cut plywood and acrylic, 66 x 89cm

Troy Innocent’s solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery takes the concept of an interactive gallery space to a new dimension. Innocent’s hybrid language that exists within the rules and systems of a digital world is expressed through signs and symbols of the artist’s invention, creating an ongoing conversation with the gallery itself. In this space, the viewer becomes a part Innocent’s media landscape, experiencing a realm between digital and material, familiar and strange, virtual and actual, abstraction and reality.

Digital art can often be screen based, however Innocent focuses instead on the world of code, creating an interactive language that spans across sculpture, sound, programming, animation and installation. These landscapes incorporate viewers within the design, experiencing this mixed reality as a merging of real and virtual worlds where the physical and digital co-exist and interact.

Abstraction is explored through colour, form and space, but also through the concept of organising reality into a multitude of layers where each layer rearranges and abstracts the work further. Innocent is attracted by the idea of a post-digital society that no longer processes information through human experiences and values, but rather through a complex, self-reliant system, essential to this new abstraction.

Inviting the viewer into this world, Innocent drives this concept of a pliable reality, whether it is deconstructed, unfolded or pushing the boundaries within space itself to examine relationships between language, experience and code, creating a continuing dialogue into the abstraction of our own environment.

Innocent holds a Doctorate of Philosophy in Animation and Interactive media, from RMIT University, Melbourne and completed his diploma of graphic design and postgraduate diploma of Animation and Interactive Multimedia at Swinburne University, Melbourne. His solo exhibitions include Asemic Writing 1 (2013) and Nine Signs for Ogaki (2012), both at Hugo Michell Gallery, Adelaide; Tokyo Pop // Ludean Play, Trocadero Art Space, Melbourne (2011); Scenes from Ludea, Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney (2006) and Ludea, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne (2005). Innocent has a strong public art practice, his projects include Zydnei, City of Sydney as part of the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA)(2013); Urban Codemakers, City of Melbourne Laneways Comission (2010); Colony, Melbourne Docklands (2008); x-milieu, Federation Square Melbourne (2008) and Field of Play, Melbourne Docklands (2007). He has participated in numerous group exhibitions at spaces such as the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland; Tate Gallery, Liverpool, UK; Performance Space, Sydney and the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne.

Emma Coulter — Chrominance
May
15
Jun 28

Emma Coulter — Chrominance

Emma Coulter, Multichromatic Synesthesia #1, 2015, synthetic paint on linen, 152 x 152cm

Emma Coulter, Multichromatic Synesthesia #1, 2015, synthetic paint on linen, 152 x 152cm

Interested in the concept of liminal space, Emma Coulter creates expansive paintings that leap from the wall into the physical plane, utilising saturated hues to enhance this metaphysical element. The colours that Coulter uses play off relationships based on placement, proportion and adjacency in response to space to create prismatic realms where imagination can take hold.

For this exhibition, Coulter will be creating site-specific works that continue the theme of painting as an expanded field, relating to the concept of chrominance. As an approach to painting, chrominance unites site, colour and space, while also alluding to colour being a dominant substance, rather than as a secondary element to the work.

Through her approach to colour and painting, Coulter deliberately controls our experience – spatial elements will be revealed, destroyed and reinvented, defined by the site and situation, creating an interstitial space that exists between place and painting.

Coulter is currently undertaking her Master of Contemporary Art at the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne and also holds a bachelor of Visual Art from the Queensland University of Technology. Coulter has exhibited nationally and internationally, including solo exhibitions Threshold (2014) Five Walls, Melbourne, and Viscerality (2011) Kunstraum Tapir Gallery, Berlin, as well as numerous group exhibitions, including No Werk (2014) Trocardo Artspace, Melbourne, Abstractions, (2013) Janet Clayton Gallery, Sydney, and The Space Between (2011) Neukolin, Berlin. Coulter was a finalist in the Windsor Prize, 2014 and the Sydney emerging artist 20/20 program in 2013 and is a recipient of a Jim Marks Postgraduate Scholarship (2014). In 2015, she will also exhibit in Brooklyn, New York City at CHASM gallery. Her work is in collections at Artesian Capital Management, Citigroup Wealth Advisors and Tower Books, as well as numerous private collections in Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany.

Steaphan Paton — Wallung Githa Unsettled
Apr
10
May 10

Steaphan Paton — Wallung Githa Unsettled

Wallung Githa Unsettled, Bagwan (Concealed), 2015, photographic print, edition of 5 + AP

Wallung Githa Unsettled, Bagwan (Concealed), 2015, photographic print, edition of 5 + AP

Opening Drinks: Friday 10 April, 6pm

Guest Speaker: Reko Rennie, Artist

Exhibition: 10 April – 9 May 2015

Central to the work of the Wallung Githa Unsettled exhibition is the ‘White Woman of Gippsland,’ a controversial figure said to have been captive to the ‘ruthless savages’ in the 1840s. This story many regard as a cover for pastoralists fighting the Gunai people for her ‘rescue’, while truly engaging in an asymmetric war for land and pasture.

Steaphan Paton’s exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery is an installation alongside a collaborative series of images, co-authored by photographer Cameron Cope, exploding the euphemism of ‘settlement’ and communicating the violent truth of Australia’s colonial past. 

‘Wallung Githa’ is Gunai language for ‘my stones’, a reference to ownership of country, in Paton’s work, while the photographic series ‘Unsettled’ is an interpretation and expression of stories set on highly sensitive battle sites, massacre sites, original homesteads, watering holes and ceremonial grounds in Gunaikurnai country.

Cameron Cope is a photographer based in Melbourne who describes his art practice as conceptual documentary, but is also an award winning travel journalist. He grew up in Gippsland and has a mixed European background that in Australia dates back to the late 19th century. Cope regularly contributes to a number of publications, exhibits widely and has work held in the permanent collection of the Melbourne Museum.

Steaphan Paton is an interdisciplinary artist based in Melbourne, and a member of the Gunai Nation, who grew up in the Gippsland area. He has been included in numerous group, festival and prize exhibitions including the Nextwave Festival with his project My Bullock Modified (2014), and Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria (2013). He has held several solo exhibitions including Boorun’s Canoe, Melbourne Museum (2012) and Where the trees are big and green, Latrobe Contemporary Gallery (2011). Paton was the recipient of the Victorian Indigenous Art Awards – Highly Commended (2007), and has been shortlisted for the prize on multiple occasions (2014, 2013, 2012, 2011). His work is held in collections at the National Gallery of Victoria, the Melbourne Museum, Brooklyn Art Library and the Wellington Shire Council.