Filtering by: 2015

Group Show 2015 – Various Artists
Dec
11
to Dec 24

Group Show 2015 – Various Artists

Simon MacEwan,  The Floating World: Russian Ruble - Ukrainian Hryvnia 21-11-13 - 31-8-15 , 2015, ink on rag paper, unique state mechanical drawing, 70x70cm

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World: Russian Ruble - Ukrainian Hryvnia 21-11-13 - 31-8-15, 2015, ink on rag paper, unique state mechanical drawing, 70x70cm

Another year of fabulous exhibitions has come to an end. Join us in a celebration of our diverse stable, the festive season and wave goodbye to 2015.

Artists include: Emma Coulter, Matt Coyle, Sue Dodd, Betra Fraval, Sam Grigorian, Samuel Hodge, Troy Innocent, Benjamin Lichtenstein, Joanna Logue, Simon MacEwan, Gian Manik, Ian Paradine, Steaphan Paton, David Ray, Jack Rowland, Marc Standing, Kāryn Taylor, Justin Williams & Jarek Wojcik.

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Betra Fraval — Falling into the Sky
Nov
6
to Dec 6

Betra Fraval — Falling into the Sky

Betra Fraval,  Beam , 2015, oil on linen, 91 x 81cm

Betra Fraval, Beam, 2015, oil on linen, 91 x 81cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 6 NOVEMBER – 5 DECEMBER, 2015

“It is just one small step from Earth-matter to Space-light. A leap or a take-off able to free us for a moment from gravity.” — Paul Virilio

Betra Fraval is a UK-born, Melbourne-based artist whose installation and painting practice explores the transient nature of all forms. Fraval’s works explore moments when grand monuments fade and dissolve. Her delicate imagery portrays softly rendered ruptures and disconnections.

For her solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Fraval will present an installation where the viewer can interact with a central sculpture, as well as a series of works on paper and canvas. The installation explores forces that direct human experiences and interactions with the world. Driven by Fraval’s intense curiosity, her work unites art, science and subjective experiences.

Our everyday lives are a performance, held in place by the hidden structure of perceived safety, and against the ever-present awareness of time. An attempt to take flight, together with elements of the trapeze – an apparatus ready for playful performance – is a recurring theme in the work. Our trust is placed in the invisible net, waiting below.

Graduating from the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA), Melbourne Australia in 2014, Fraval was the recipient of the annual Galloway Lawson Prize for Excellence; Tolarno Art Prize; The Maude Glover Flea Award; and The Seventh Gallery Exhibition Grant (Making Space ARI Festival 2007). She was shortlisted for the Elisabeth Murdoch Traveling Fellowship in 2009 and received a residency at Sanskriti Kendra, New Delhi, India. Selected solo exhibitions include: The Rope Doesn’t Hang, The Earth Pulls, 2015, Five Walls, Melbourne; Still Remains, 2013, c3 Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne; The Dead Trees Gives No Shelter, 2012, Linden New Art, Melbourne; Unstable Ground, 2008, Victoria Park Gallery, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include McClelland Sculpture Prize, 2014,McClelland Sculpture Park and Gallery, Langwarrin; Disappear, 2011, Kings ARI, Melbourne; A4 Art, 2011 West Space, Melbourne and Forged, 2010, Trocadero Gallery, Melbourne.

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Sue Dodd — Travelogue Super Uncertain
Nov
5
to Dec 6

Sue Dodd — Travelogue Super Uncertain

Sue Dodd,  The Other Side , 2015, production still, dimensions variable

Sue Dodd, The Other Side, 2015, production still, dimensions variable

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 6 NOVEMBER – 5 DECEMBER, 2015

For her upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Sue Dodd will create a series of performative video, song, and animation works exploring the theme of travel, leisure and technology, taking the viewer on a desperate imaginary trip to nowhere. Mimicking the constructs of commercial music videos and production stills, Dodd will create simulated hallucinogenic journeys with hyper-real, almost toxic colours and visual effects. Through these works, Dodd is playfully interrogating notions of leisure and escapism and questioning the construction/s of identity within consumer culture.

Dodd’s practice incorporates performance, music, video and installation, and responds to the contemporary cultural landscape of globalisation, homogeneity and desire. Dodd looks at the playful and expressive potentials of pop, mass media and celebrity culture to challenge audience relationships to the artwork and demonstrate possibilities for hybrid modes of production.

Selected solo exhibitions include: Wendy Airhole, 2013 Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Technopia Tours w Kim Donaldson, 2013, Art Stage Singapore, Singapore (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); Best of: A Survey of Gossip Pop, 2013 Techno Park Studios, Melbourne; Watch Me Buy Me, 2009, ACMI, Melbourne.

Selected group exhibitions include: Art Athina Contemporaries: Statements Made, 2014, curated by Artemis Potamianou, Athens (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); MAF Video Program: Staging Actions, 2014, curated by Kyle Weise and Simone Hine, Melbourne Art Fair (courtesy of Anna Pappas Gallery); Don’t Kurt Cobain, 2014, curated by Lisa Radford and Rosemary Forde, Slopes, Melbourne; AwesomeRepeatxInfinityBonus;-), 2014 curated by Sue Dodd, Trocadero, Melbourne; Moving on Asia: Towards a New Art Network 2004-2013, 2013, City Gallery, Auckland; Move On Asia: Video Art in Asia, 2002-2012, 2013, ZKM, Karlsruhe; My Avante-Garde is Bigger Than Yours, 2013, Kings, Melbourne; Now Hear This – Melbourne Now, 2013, National Gallery of Victoria; This Is Not A Love Song, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Technopia Tours, 2012, StudioVisits, Berlin; Frame_Birmingham, 2012, Clarke Gallery, Birmingham; Pursuit, 2012, Delhi Art Fair; Significant Others, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne Art Fair; Radio Alice, 2012, Margaret Lawrence Gallery, VCA, Melbourne.

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Michaela Gleave + Cameron Robbins — Lines of Sight
Oct
9
to Nov 1

Michaela Gleave + Cameron Robbins — Lines of Sight

Michaela Gleave,  Eclipse Machine (Retograde Motion) , 2015, projection lamp, motors, prisms, timber, stand, 70 x 70 x 140cm

Michaela Gleave, Eclipse Machine (Retograde Motion), 2015, projection lamp, motors, prisms, timber, stand, 70 x 70 x 140cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 9 – 31 OCTOBER, 2015

SPECIAL EVENT: Occulation of Venus astronomical viewing at 4:00am | October 9 | Royal Park, Parkville. Click here for more information.

Lines of Sight is a collaborative exhibition by Michaela Gleave and Cameron Robbins. For these two artists, the cosmological and ephemeral have been long-standing interests. For their exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Gleave and Robbins will create individual works, as well as a collaborative piece.

Utilising tricks of perception and relationships between space, matter and time, Gleave investigates the systems and structures that construct our everyday reality. Her installations are immersive and atmospheric, and rely on the viewers’ relationship with their surroundings, often mimicking the organic construct of natural phenomena.

Robbins will exhibit a new series of wind and light photographs which continue his interest in unpredictability and chaos, but also the rhythm and patterns of nature. Robbins will continue his enthusiasm for site-responsive kinetic sculptures with his work in Lines of Sight.

The interests of these two artists perfectly align to create a charged exhibition.

Michaela Gleave holds a Master of Fine Arts (Research) from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales and completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at the School of Art, University of Tasmania. Selected solo exhibitions include A Day is Longer Than a Year, 2013, Fremantle Arts Centre, Fremantle; Into the Aether, 2013, MCA Art Bar – Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; and We Are Made of Stardust, 2012, Hong Kong International Art Fair, Hong Kong. Selected group exhibitions include Experimenta: Recharge, 2015, RMIT Gallery, touring exhibition; Elemental Phenomena, 2015, Griffith University Art Gallery, Brisbane; Project 15 DEATH / LIFE, 2015, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; New Worlds: Science Fiction & Contemporary Art, 2014, CoFA Galleries, Sydney; and Trace: Performative Works from the Collection, 2014, The Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane. Gleave has completed residencies in New York, Tokyo and Berlin, and is held in private collections in Australia, Germany and the UK.

Cameron Robbins has been a practicing artist for 25 years. Selected solo exhibitions include Var Jevn Dogn Equinox, 2015, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; The Red Queen, 2014, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart; and Melbourne Now, 2013-14, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions, such as Motorenwerke, 2015, Galerie oqbo, Berlin; FreeRange, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; and the Hong Kong, and Korean International Art Fair’s in 2011. Robbin’s work is held in the National Gallery of Australia, the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, and Scienceworks, Museum of Victoria, amongst others.

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Kᾱryn Taylor — Immaterial Alchemy
Sep
3
to Oct 4

Kᾱryn Taylor — Immaterial Alchemy

Karyn Taylor,  Time Loop In 2 Parts , 2015, Perspex, 70 x 42 x 6.5cm

Karyn Taylor, Time Loop In 2 Parts, 2015, Perspex, 70 x 42 x 6.5cm

Immaterial Alchemy reflects Kᾱryn Taylor’s deeper engagement with materiality and potentiality. Referencing formalism in its minimalist style, her work inhabits a space that exists between the material and the immaterial, cognition and precognition, ontology and epistemology.

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Simon MacEwan — The Floating World
Sep
3
to Oct 5

Simon MacEwan — The Floating World

Simon MacEwan,  The Floating World , 2015, drawing machine, 120 x 120 x 110cm (Programming, and automation assistance, by Finn Robertson)

Simon MacEwan, The Floating World, 2015, drawing machine, 120 x 120 x 110cm (Programming, and automation assistance, by Finn Robertson)

OPENING DRINKS: THURSDAY 3 SEPTEMBER, 6PM
EXHIBITION: 3 SEPTEMBER – 3 OCTOBER, 2015
ARTIST TALK: SATURDAY 19 SEPTEMBER, 1PM

Simon MacEwan’s The Floating World traces parallels between the history of currency and modernist artistic strategies.

In the centre of the room a drawing machine operates; inside the steel structure gears slowly turn, bearings roll and counterweights tremble as a pivoting arm drags a pen in a looping curve across a sheet of paper. As the pen draws, the table that holds the paper slowly revolves, and as it turns the loop becomes a spiral; a curving grid that falls back on itself as the pen describes the subtly varying orbits of the drawing arm.

Money
In the 19th century, as money changed from gold to the promise of gold in the form of paper notes, it became necessary to take ever greater measures against forgery, and soengineers developed geometric lathes to make patterns so complex and delicate that without the original machine and the secret of its settings they would prove impossible to copy.

This form of encryption became the visual language of paper currency, and though it now exists only as anachronistic decoration, the idea continues in other forms; in a world where money is largely immaterial, it inhabits the secret numbers of encryption algorithms that verify and protect electronic transactions, finding its purest expression in currencies like Bitcoin .

Art
Roughly concurrent with the shifts of money, from material object fixed in time and space, to virtual commodity, there is a parallel transformation in the history of art. Starting with the early-modern break from representation and carrying through to the development of conceptual art, artists have resisted authorship and the creation of singular art objects.

This movement is characterised by a dual retreat; the artist becomes further removed from the physical production of the artwork; employing others to perform the creation of the works, such as Andy Warhol’s Serigraphs or more, recently the work of Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst. At the same time there are artists who use strategies of seriality undermine authorship and singular creative acts, setting parameters where the series of works that result are the products of an initial score, and function only in relation to each other as a series.

Art works themselves become less and less tied to the specificity of physical objects and locations, as in the art of Sol LeWitt where the work exists as the possibility of its execution according to a particular set of instructions in a space designated by whoever has purchased the right to have those instructions enacted.

Art + Money
As money becomes immaterial, traded at immense speeds across huge distances, it also becomes exquisitely sensitive, like a seismograph tracking the spread of news and the hunches of stockbrokers, and so the asocial and anti-historical qualities of currency exchange ultimately make it beholden to the social and the local. Similarly, the dematerialised LeWitt work becomes inextricable from the web of dependencies that

underpin its existence as a work of art; from the documents of ownership, loan agreements and instructions for execution, to the institutional spaces and surfaces where it appears, and the social and professional networks that gather the people to do the physical labour of manifesting the work.

In the end there is no escape from the physical, as both art and currency leave the bounds or their own objects, they don’t cease to exist, instead they inhere in other places, distributed across server hard drives, optic fibres, documents and in the bodies of those who interact with them.

The Floating World draws on these histories of dematerialisation of both money and art.  Based on the principles of 19th century geometric lathes, the mechanisms of the drawing machine trace patterns across the paper that resemble the ornaments still found on banknotes, but the movements of the machine are computer drawing information from currency exchange data. The drawing machine transforms the stream of stock ticker numbers into slow arabesques, and the regularity of this pattern depends on the stability of the currencies charted; as the exchange rate shifts so does the pattern, and so the language of the stability of money becomes a device to describe its contingency and instability. The Floating World makes art of commerce, cryptically graphing the impact of events and ideas in the ripples they make in the flow of numbers of international exchange markets, paper notes of the space between money.

Simon MacEwan holds a Bachelor of Fine Art (Sculpture) from RMIT, Melbourne, a Diploma of Visual Art from RMIT, Melbourne and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Melbourne. MacEwan has exhibited with Anna Pappas Gallery since 2008. Selected solo exhibitions include: all that is solid melts into air, 2012, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; The World’s Fair, 2011, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; You’re doing it wrong, 2010, c3 contemporary art space, Melbourne, Batmania, 2009, Bus gallery, Melbourne, built to fail, 2005, Seventh Gallery, Melbourne and lost in the woods, 2004, Seventh Gallery, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include: Melbourne Art Fair, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Farewell 2013, 2013, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Others, 2013, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Duality: Banyule Award for Works on Paper (Highly Commended), 2011, project11, 2011, Anna Pappas Gallery, Melbourne; Banyule City Council, Melbourne, Grow Wild, 2008, Utopian Slumps, Melbourne, Lost Garden Found, 2006, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne and Where the Wild Things Are, 2005, UTS Gallery, Sydney. MacEwan’s works are held in numerous collections including Artbank, the Banyule City Council and private collections in Australia.

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Benjamin Lichtenstein — Living in Oblivion
Aug
7
to Aug 30

Benjamin Lichtenstein — Living in Oblivion

Benjamin Lichtenstein,  It's like a brothel in here , 2015, unique state silver gelatin print, 84 x 119cm

Benjamin Lichtenstein, It's like a brothel in here, 2015, unique state silver gelatin print, 84 x 119cm

OPENING DRINKS: Friday 7 August, 6pm

EXHIBITION: 7 August – 29 August, 2015

Benjamin Lichtenstein does not simply take photographs – he creates them. For this young, upcoming artist, the process does not end at the camera, but extends to the darkroom and beyond. Manipulating the images by hand, strong lines and restrained patterns begin to arise. Merging photography with collage and drawing, the surface of the image is blended to the point where the original medium is no longer recognisable.

For his solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Lichtenstein will present a new body of monochromatic works. The multi-panelled compositions embody the artist’s unique imagery through painting masks in the darkroom printing process. Living in Oblivion is Lichtenstein’s most ambitious body of work to date, exceeding the usual dimensions of his work and pushing the limits during the printing process. Living in Oblivion references the film of the same name, described as ‘a film about filmmaking’, alluding to Lichtenstein’s technical proficiency and experimentation with photography as a medium.

Lichtenstein’s images capture the hand of the artist in a way the medium usually denies. The resulting monochromatic creations are unique prints, each work personifying an intimate and distinctive vision.

Lichtenstein holds a Bachelor of Fine Art, Photography, from the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne. Selected solo exhibitions include Flower, 2015, Fort Delta, Melbourne; Paperwork, 2014, 136 Johnston Street, Melbourne; Crescent, 2014, Neospace, Melbourne; Run, Warwick Baker, 2013, The John and Marion Frye Collection, Los Angeles; and I Know You Will Be Happy Here, 2013, Utopian Slumps Project Room, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include View From the Window, 2014, Edmund Pearce; Mental, 2014, Muddguts, New York City; Das Boot Fair, 2014, Next Wave Festival, Melbourne; and This Has Been, 2013, c3 Contemporary Art Space, Melbourne. Lichtenstein has also been a finalist in the Bowness Prize, for Run, Warwick Baker #3, 2013, and recipient of the Kodak Salon at the Centre for Contemporary Photography (Excellence in Photomedia) for Saturday night’s alright, 2006.

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Gian Manik — Umbrella
Aug
7
to Aug 30

Gian Manik — Umbrella

Gian Manik,  Untitled 14 (detail) , 2015, oil on canvas, 137 x 152.5cm

Gian Manik, Untitled 14 (detail), 2015, oil on canvas, 137 x 152.5cm

OPENING DRINKS: Friday 7 August, 6pm

EXHIBITION: 7 – 29 August, 2015

Gian Manik’s work is highly conceptual and deeply rooted in materiality. His creative process stems from his artistic materials, which act as a springboard for imagined systems or structures. The potential for creation is the driving force; a space of growth and of bringing something into existence is essential.

For his solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Manik will present a new body of work that continues his engagement with painting images of mirrored surfaces. The works are rooted in an element of chance, as the subjects of his paintings are dependent on what appears in the reflection. This includes abstracted images of the artist’s body, windows, walls and even other paintings in the studio. Worlds within worlds are created and manipulated, and what is produced on the canvas arrives through multifaceted pathways.

Manik explores the liminal space that exists when numerous visual devices are utilised. The space ‘in between’ also exists in the physical realm, between the mirror, the object, the painter and the canvas. These elements vibrate and coalesce into an image that transcribes the essence of the artist’s environment.

Manik holds a Master of Fine Arts from Monash University, and completed his Bachelor of Arts, Visual Arts (Honours) at Curtin University of Technology. Selected solo exhibitions include Big Recorder, 2013, Alaska Projects, Sydney; The Retreat to Representation, 2012, Venn Gallery, Perth; and Decorative Backings, 2011, Artbeat, Melbourne. Selected group exhibitions include Fresh Paint, 2013, Melbourne Pool, Compound Interest, Melbourne; and Joondalup Invitation Art Award Exhibition, 2009, Lakeside Complex, Joondalup. Manik has also held residencies at the Gunnery Artspace, Sydney, 2009, and at the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, 2008.

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Justin Williams — Stained Mountain
Jul
3
to Aug 2

Justin Williams — Stained Mountain

Justin Williams,  Baba Desi , 2015, oil on paper, 43 x 53cm

Justin Williams, Baba Desi, 2015, oil on paper, 43 x 53cm

OPENING DRINKS: FRIDAY 3 JULY, 6PM

EXHIBITION: 3 JULY – 1 AUGUST 2015

Justin Williams creates work that is quietly mystical. It reaches us from a place of subversive beauty, where urban legends and local stories contain strange and wonderful characters. It is these characters that interest and inform a new body of sculptures and paintings, which delve into the mysteries of the mountain where Williams lives and works.

For his upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery, Justin Williams is presenting an exploration into concepts and constructions of beauty. Stained Mountain investigates people and myths, such as the disappearance and suspected murder of celebrity chef, Willi Koeppen in 1976, and the colourful character known simply as The Wizard of Belgrave, Baba Desi – an activist, humanist and local icon who adorns himself in flowing robes and jewellery.

The beauty within the grotesque interests Williams greatly, weaving through stories that surround these local figures. This idyllic location in the mountain ranges contains sometimes unpleasant, yet always enigmatic figures that exist in an ever-shrinking space, outside of society’s eye.

Raw and honest, Williams is delving into the internal struggle of the duality between light and dark, beauty and hostility, legends and truth; these works are both finished, yet unfinished, as are the people and stories that inform them. His paintings reveal landscapes shimmering in a space between public and hidden worlds; his sculptures speak of characters living within the confines of an almost smothering forest.

Justin Williams holds a Bachelor of Communication and Design, Majoring in Printmaking and Illustration from Swinburn University. He has held numerous solo exhibitions including Viridian, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery; Mountain I Miss You, 2013, Mild Manner, Brisbane; A Touch of Norway, 2012, Lapis Lazuli Pop Up Factory Gallery, Melbourne. His selected group exhibitions include at the Melbourne Art Fair in 2014; Project 14: Free Range, 2014, Anna Pappas Gallery; Trouble in Paradise, 2012, Paradise Hills Gallery, Melbourne; and Group Show, 2012, Scott Livesey Galleries, Melbourne. He has been featured in Artist Profile, Australian Creative and New York Arts Magazine.

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Jarek Wojcik — Spaces and Things
Jul
3
to Aug 1

Jarek Wojcik — Spaces and Things

Jarek Wojcik,  Ambient , 2015, acrylic on linen, 168 x 198 cm

Jarek Wojcik, Ambient, 2015, acrylic on linen, 168 x 198 cm

Space and Things is a journey into a world of hyper-realistic images that cannot, in fact, be real. These works invite the viewer to travel through the narrative, finding links and images that seem familiar, yet slightly puzzling.

Rich in their imagery, illuminated almost by candlelight, Wojcik transports the viewer to an enchanting and surreal place. The paintings will explore the perception of a Nuevo Riche, clichéd in its obsession with trophies and image, and deeply rooted in a historical understanding of bourgeois culture, yet existing in a modern environment. These are not classical paintings, but in fact a whimsical take on the historical; painting things in spaces, Wojcik’s Spaces and Things is a little bit tongue in cheek.

The painted scenes are not necessarily real or physical, but a mental landscape where one can freely imagine and create. Wojcik responds to his surroundings in this way and through the study of history, resulting in something that feels as though remembered from a distant past, yet vigorously new. In conversation with reality and imagination, a combination of both exists in this opulently detailed work; the audience is drawn in and the imagination is intrigued to believe wholeheartedly in this world – until we are reminded by Wojcik’s wit, that it is, nevertheless, satire.

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Troy Innocent — New Abstraction
May
15
to Jun 28

Troy Innocent — New Abstraction

Troy Innocent,  Delta , 2014, laser cut plywood and acrylic, 66 x 89cm

Troy Innocent, Delta, 2014, laser cut plywood and acrylic, 66 x 89cm

Troy Innocent’s solo exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery takes the concept of an interactive gallery space to a new dimension. Innocent’s hybrid language that exists within the rules and systems of a digital world is expressed through signs and symbols of the artist’s invention, creating an ongoing conversation with the gallery itself. In this space, the viewer becomes a part Innocent’s media landscape, experiencing a realm between digital and material, familiar and strange, virtual and actual, abstraction and reality.

Digital art can often be screen based, however Innocent focuses instead on the world of code, creating an interactive language that spans across sculpture, sound, programming, animation and installation. These landscapes incorporate viewers within the design, experiencing this mixed reality as a merging of real and virtual worlds where the physical and digital co-exist and interact.

Abstraction is explored through colour, form and space, but also through the concept of organising reality into a multitude of layers where each layer rearranges and abstracts the work further. Innocent is attracted by the idea of a post-digital society that no longer processes information through human experiences and values, but rather through a complex, self-reliant system, essential to this new abstraction.

Inviting the viewer into this world, Innocent drives this concept of a pliable reality, whether it is deconstructed, unfolded or pushing the boundaries within space itself to examine relationships between language, experience and code, creating a continuing dialogue into the abstraction of our own environment.

Innocent holds a Doctorate of Philosophy in Animation and Interactive media, from RMIT University, Melbourne and completed his diploma of graphic design and postgraduate diploma of Animation and Interactive Multimedia at Swinburne University, Melbourne. His solo exhibitions include Asemic Writing 1 (2013) and Nine Signs for Ogaki (2012), both at Hugo Michell Gallery, Adelaide; Tokyo Pop // Ludean Play, Trocadero Art Space, Melbourne (2011); Scenes from Ludea, Boutwell Draper Gallery, Sydney (2006) and Ludea, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne (2005). Innocent has a strong public art practice, his projects include Zydnei, City of Sydney as part of the International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA)(2013); Urban Codemakers, City of Melbourne Laneways Comission (2010); Colony, Melbourne Docklands (2008); x-milieu, Federation Square Melbourne (2008) and Field of Play, Melbourne Docklands (2007). He has participated in numerous group exhibitions at spaces such as the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland; Tate Gallery, Liverpool, UK; Performance Space, Sydney and the State Library of Victoria, Melbourne.

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Emma Coulter — Chrominance
May
15
to Jun 28

Emma Coulter — Chrominance

Emma Coulter,  Multichromatic Synesthesia #1 , 2015, synthetic paint on linen, 152 x 152cm

Emma Coulter, Multichromatic Synesthesia #1, 2015, synthetic paint on linen, 152 x 152cm

Interested in the concept of liminal space, Emma Coulter creates expansive paintings that leap from the wall into the physical plane, utilising saturated hues to enhance this metaphysical element. The colours that Coulter uses play off relationships based on placement, proportion and adjacency in response to space to create prismatic realms where imagination can take hold.

For this exhibition, Coulter will be creating site-specific works that continue the theme of painting as an expanded field, relating to the concept of chrominance. As an approach to painting, chrominance unites site, colour and space, while also alluding to colour being a dominant substance, rather than as a secondary element to the work.

Through her approach to colour and painting, Coulter deliberately controls our experience – spatial elements will be revealed, destroyed and reinvented, defined by the site and situation, creating an interstitial space that exists between place and painting.

Coulter is currently undertaking her Master of Contemporary Art at the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne and also holds a bachelor of Visual Art from the Queensland University of Technology. Coulter has exhibited nationally and internationally, including solo exhibitions Threshold (2014) Five Walls, Melbourne, and Viscerality (2011) Kunstraum Tapir Gallery, Berlin, as well as numerous group exhibitions, including No Werk (2014) Trocardo Artspace, Melbourne, Abstractions, (2013) Janet Clayton Gallery, Sydney, and The Space Between (2011) Neukolin, Berlin. Coulter was a finalist in the Windsor Prize, 2014 and the Sydney emerging artist 20/20 program in 2013 and is a recipient of a Jim Marks Postgraduate Scholarship (2014). In 2015, she will also exhibit in Brooklyn, New York City at CHASM gallery. Her work is in collections at Artesian Capital Management, Citigroup Wealth Advisors and Tower Books, as well as numerous private collections in Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany.

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Steaphan Paton — Wallung Githa Unsettled
Apr
10
to May 10

Steaphan Paton — Wallung Githa Unsettled

Wallung Githa Unsettled,  Bagwan (Concealed) , 2015, photographic print, edition of 5 + AP

Wallung Githa Unsettled, Bagwan (Concealed), 2015, photographic print, edition of 5 + AP

Opening Drinks: Friday 10 April, 6pm

Guest Speaker: Reko Rennie, Artist

Exhibition: 10 April – 9 May 2015

Central to the work of the Wallung Githa Unsettled exhibition is the ‘White Woman of Gippsland,’ a controversial figure said to have been captive to the ‘ruthless savages’ in the 1840s. This story many regard as a cover for pastoralists fighting the Gunai people for her ‘rescue’, while truly engaging in an asymmetric war for land and pasture.

Steaphan Paton’s exhibition at Anna Pappas Gallery is an installation alongside a collaborative series of images, co-authored by photographer Cameron Cope, exploding the euphemism of ‘settlement’ and communicating the violent truth of Australia’s colonial past. 

‘Wallung Githa’ is Gunai language for ‘my stones’, a reference to ownership of country, in Paton’s work, while the photographic series ‘Unsettled’ is an interpretation and expression of stories set on highly sensitive battle sites, massacre sites, original homesteads, watering holes and ceremonial grounds in Gunaikurnai country.

Cameron Cope is a photographer based in Melbourne who describes his art practice as conceptual documentary, but is also an award winning travel journalist. He grew up in Gippsland and has a mixed European background that in Australia dates back to the late 19th century. Cope regularly contributes to a number of publications, exhibits widely and has work held in the permanent collection of the Melbourne Museum.

Steaphan Paton is an interdisciplinary artist based in Melbourne, and a member of the Gunai Nation, who grew up in the Gippsland area. He has been included in numerous group, festival and prize exhibitions including the Nextwave Festival with his project My Bullock Modified (2014), and Melbourne Now, National Gallery of Victoria (2013). He has held several solo exhibitions including Boorun’s Canoe, Melbourne Museum (2012) and Where the trees are big and green, Latrobe Contemporary Gallery (2011). Paton was the recipient of the Victorian Indigenous Art Awards – Highly Commended (2007), and has been shortlisted for the prize on multiple occasions (2014, 2013, 2012, 2011). His work is held in collections at the National Gallery of Victoria, the Melbourne Museum, Brooklyn Art Library and the Wellington Shire Council.

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David Ray — Trickster
Apr
10
to May 10

David Ray — Trickster

David Ray,  Figure 1  (detail), 2015, earthenware, enamel, gold, 15 x 10 x 10cm

David Ray, Figure 1 (detail), 2015, earthenware, enamel, gold, 15 x 10 x 10cm

Opening Drinks: Friday 10 April, 6pm

Exhibition: 10 April – 9 May 2015

The concept of the ‘trickster’ is longstanding in our culture – the comedian who tells a horrible truth in a hilarious way, the lovable larrikin who hides mischief behind laughter. A crucial element of this character is that their presence and creativity challenges cultural norms. Both a creator and violator of culture, the ‘trickster’ influences David Ray in his subversion of what ceramics should or are perceived to be. Underneath the aristocratic sheep’s clothing of traditionally perceived beauty, hides the wolf serving as a guise of dysfunction.

Ray will exhibit new ceramic works that are the result of his residency in Liverpool, UK. In these neo-baroque ceramic works, Ray explores the physicality of materials and concepts of the hand-made in a continuously outsourced society. The artist also plays with our perceptions under the guise of the ‘trickster’.

David Ray holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours), in ceramics, from RMIT University and has participated in a wide range of exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include Infinite Variety, Nellie Castan Gallery (2012) and a retrospective show at Ararat Regional Gallery (2012). Ray has also been involved in many group exhibitions including the Cicely and Colin Rigg Contemporary Design Award, Ian Potter Centre: NGV (2012); Collaborative Witness, UQ Art Museum (2011); Childhood, Craft Victoria (2010); New Under the Sun, Jewish Museum of Australia (2010) and Who Let the Dogs Out, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery & Hazelhurst Regional Gallery (2008). Ray’s work is held in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria, the Jewish Museum of Australia, The Victorian College of the Arts, Swan Hill Regional Gallery, Shepparton Art Museum, RMIT, Queensland University of Technology and The Clay Studio Philadelphia.

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Samuel Hodge — Buzz Kill
Mar
6
to Apr 2

Samuel Hodge — Buzz Kill

Samuel Hodge,  Some Guy , 2011, digital archive print

Samuel Hodge, Some Guy, 2011, digital archive print

Buzz Kill represents Sydney based artist Samuel Hodge’s first solo exhibition in Melbourne at Anna Pappas Gallery. Rather than framing the exhibition as a historical survey of his last 15 years of practice, Hodge sees the exhibition as a starting point for future investigations into portraiture and an expanded notion of image production and re-creation. For this exhibition the artist presents a suite of photographs taken from his archive and a series of experimental modelling clay works in a new assemblage.

Samuel Hodge (b. Glen Innes, Australia) is an artist whose projects have taken the form of exhibitions, publications, online platforms, fashion shoots, and text-based work. His practice is centred on the reappropriation of the archive through the medium of photography. Through the selection and then reconstruction of found imagery, he manipulates the intention of the original image in order to interrogate modes of narrative and constructions of the self at play in photography. His images and their subjects are instead submitted to a state of ambiguity, to a constant state of ecstatic and desirous resistance to conclusive representation.

Samuel Hodge appears courtesy of ALASKA Projects Sydney.

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Sam Fagan — A Line Between
Mar
5
to Apr 2

Sam Fagan — A Line Between

Sam Fagan,  In part (detail) , 2015, pigment ink on archival tissue, digital photo print, newspaper, vinyl, steel, glass, enamel spray

Sam Fagan, In part (detail), 2015, pigment ink on archival tissue, digital photo print, newspaper, vinyl, steel, glass, enamel spray

Anna Pappas Gallery itself will become a part of Sam Fagan’s upcoming solo exhibition, which is site specific and responsive to the space. In A Line Between, Fagan will be exhibiting new works that subvert the familiar and question perceived reality, as well as our experiences within it.

As viewers move through the exhibition, they will experience a breakdown of exterior and interior landscapes, creating conversations between object, design and art. Fagan utilises industrial design and familiar functional objects in order to subtly subvert their essential purpose, creating unexpected encounters and unsettling the space in which they exist. There is also darkness to the work, however it is something only alluded to; a disturbing presence created by imagination and self-reflection.

Paper works will also be presented alongside the installation, creating a conflict between materials.  The fragility of the paper contrasts with the durability of industrial objects in order to produce a state of flux between the works and within the space. Using elements of collage and design on archival tissue paper, in creating the images, the surface itself breaks down, and in its destruction a sense of instability and brittleness is heightened. Questioning a reality dependant on clear visual language, Fagan ultimately remodels this language in order to destabilise and re-imagine our everyday existence.

Fagan holds a Bachelor of Arts (Fine Art Painting) and a Fine Art Honours, from the VCA. He has held solo exhibitions including In Between, Bus Projects (2014) and Minus, Dudspace, (2012), as well as numerous group exhibitions across Melbourne such as at Anna Pappas Gallery (2014), Kings ARI (2014), Blindside (2012), from which he was awarded the Blindside Debut Award, Margaret Lawrence Gallery (2011) and George Paton Gallery (2011). Fagan was also awarded the Global Art Projects Award and the Roger Kemp Memorial Prize, both in 2011. In 2013 Fagan undertook a residency with the Arteles Center in Haukijärvi, Finland.

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Project15: DEATH | LIFE — Curated by Sebastian Goldspink
Feb
7
to Mar 1

Project15: DEATH | LIFE — Curated by Sebastian Goldspink

Samuel Hodge ,  Snow Ball Fight (Gone Wrong) , 2014, photograph

Samuel Hodge , Snow Ball Fight (Gone Wrong), 2014, photograph

Designed to promote artists that push boundaries, Project15: DEATH | LIFE will showcase the talents of eleven diverse artists; Artemis Potamianou (Athens), Daniel Hollier (Sydney), Kate Scardifield (Sydney), Katie Lee (Melbourne), Kenny Pittock (Melbourne), Jason Wing (Sydney), Michaela Gleave (Sydney), Philjames (Sydney), Sam Fagan (Melbourne), Samuel Hodge (Sydney) and Tully Arnot (Melbourne), brought together under the curatorship of Sebastian Goldspink, Director, ALASKA Projects, Sydney.

DEATH | LIFE
Each night after ‘one of those days’ which had become every day, she would draw a bath and just pretend that it was going to happen for her.

She would hover her thumb over the trigger and stare cross eyed at the barrel as she slowly slid the nozzle into her mouth and tasted the bitter oily steel. She would, of course fantasise about the outcome, the act, the aftermath. 

She would imagine their reactions. The hit to their chest when they realised they got it all wrong. Got her all wrong.

Then one night, by accident, or as much as accidents can happen when you dangle the bait over the fishes head, it happened for her. It happened and at once she realised that she had it all wrong. That it wasn’t a black void, a janitor switching the lights off.

Her death life was profound. She felt each billion part of her split from her and race around the universe to different points in space making up different forms. All the while though being conscious that in death life she was the line joining the million billion dots of her. That she was God and feeling that uncontrollable desire that most feel in death life, to go back. To go back and enjoy life in the knowledge that everything works out in the end. That we are one as God and that the punch-line made you long for the rest of the joke. 

– Sebastian Goldspink, 2014

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